The Agenda: Court takes Veronica case, SC-1 race will test voter ID, Weapon permit applications spike

Lawmakers head to Columbia for '13 session

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Supreme Court agrees to hear Baby Veronica case
On Friday, the U.S. Supreme Court announced it would hear Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl the case of three-year old toddler Veronica, who was adopted and raised for two years by a James Island couple but who was forced by the State Supreme Court to be given back to her birth Native American birth father after ruling that the Indian Child Welfare Act took precedence over state law. The case is just the second the Court has heard regarding the 1978 law.
Sources: Charleston City Paper, Post and Courier, Associated Press, Live 5 News

1st District special election is state's first try with new voter ID law
After the state's new voter ID law went into effect with the new year, the March special primary and subsequent general election for the 1st Congressional District will be the first where the new rules go into practice.
Sources: Post and Courier
Related: Summey won't run for Scott's seat (CP)
Summey out of SC-1 race, but Grooms is in (P&C)
NAACP gives Scott a failing grade (ABC News 4)

2013 session shaping up to be busy
When legislators come back to Columbia this week for the 2013 legislative session, they will have a full plate of proposed reforms from changes in ethics law to property taxes.
Sources: Post and Courier
Related: State court cases could have larger effect than legislation

First-time concealed weapons permit applications up sharply in 2012
First-time applications for concealed weapons permits rose sharply, up over 250 percent in 2012 compared to 2011, with 61,766 first-time applications in 2012 compared to just 24,661 in the previous year.
Sources: Beafort Gazette, Associated Press
Related: A look at S.C. gun laws (P&C)
McCoy's insurance reforms would tighten licensing requirements (P&C)

Many state agencies have yet to implement basic security measures
Analysis by the Greenville News shows that months after a cyber-security breach where millions of state taxpayer records were stolen from state servers, most agencies are still working on implementing basic security measures.
Sources: USA Today/Greenville News
Related: The State

Sandy aid vote shows northeastern, southern factions
Nearly half of the Republicans who voted against last week's Hurricane Sandy relief bill hailed from the South, including Florida and Texas. Newly-sworn in 7th District Rep. Tom Rice of Myrtle Beach was the lone Republican from South Carolina to support the legislation.
Sources: Politico

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