The Agenda: Giraffe and confetti don't mix, City to ask for I-526, Flu comes early to S.C.

Supreme Court halts state workers' insurance rate hike

Posted by Sam Spence on Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 12:14 PM

Giraffe no likee confetti
In a move that nobody could have predicted at Saturday's city tree lighting in Marion Square Park, a live giraffe named Melvin, who was part of the ceremony, was not happy to be greeted by camera flashes, screaming children, a baritone caroler, and a confetti cannon.
Sources: Post and Courier
Video courtesy WCIV-TV:WCIV-TV | ABC News 4 - Charleston News, Sports, Weather

City to ask for I-526 control
At a special meeting tonight, the City of Charleston will make its case to County Council for the controversial I-526 beltway project to be transferred to the city's control.
Sources: ABC News 4

Advertisement

GAO says South Carolina federal prisons could be used for Gitmo detainees
In addition to the Naval brig in Ladson, Government Accountability Office says four federal corrections facilities in Bennetsville, Edgefield, Estill, and Salters could be possible locations where detainees being held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba could be moved if it is closed.
Sources: Charleston City Paper

Boeing buys SCRA North Charleston buildings
Boeing South Carolina announced today that it has bought the North Charleston office buildings owned by the South Carolina Research Authority. The offices are adjacent to the aerospace company's airport property.
Sources: Post and Courier

2012 flu cases rising
Local emergency room docs say flu season has hit early this year, with more than 1,200 of the 1,976 cases reported so far this year coming in the past 10 days.
Sources: Post and Courier

State Supreme Court temporarily halts state worker health insurance hike while considering suit
The State Supreme Court on Monday halted the scheduled 4.6% increase of state workers' health insurance, meaning that workers won't have to bear the cost increase in their own paychecks beginning next month. Earlier this year, Gov. Haley clashed with state legislators who voted to pay the cost of the rate hike when she convinced the State Budget and Control Board to overrule lawmakers and have workers pay for the increase.
Sources: The State

Add a comment