Spoleto 2012 » Comedy

The Reformed Whores share wisdom gleaned from their slutty ways

Bawdy and Sweet

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With angelic faces and voices sweet as pie, Marie Cecile Anderson and Katy Frame of Reformed Whores are trying to whore less and sing more. "We are reformed whores and are trying to date like normal people. I don't know how y'all do it," says Katie in the introduction. The comedic musical duo craftily set their bawdy lyrics to sweet melodies and harmonies while playing accordion, acoustic guitar, ukulele, and tambourine. With an ironic concept that works, Katy and Marie make the most of their Southerness, in which even whores are sweet as sugar cane as they reminisce over one-night stands and drunk dialing ex-boyfriends.

Donning ruffly western dresses in pastel gingham and cowboy boots that look like they came out of a 1950s Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, Katy and Marie share their personal stories in a musical repertoire of western, country, bluegrass, and traditional Irish styles. They start the show with a Marty Robbins styled satire to which most women over 20 years old can relate, "Douchebags Wherever You Go," recalling their experiences in slutdom and the men who lived there.

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Their smiles may be sweet, but these girls could make a gang-banger from Brooklyn blush. With tunes describing past relationships, such as "Connie Says You've Got V.D. and "Southern Cumfort," Reformed Whores do not emote romance. However, they do provide helpful dating advice from Katy's daddy in the catchy "Drunk Dial": "Don't drunk dial when you come home late, don't text him with a booty call." In "Mama's Song," they apologize for embarrassing the family. For the sexually liberated reformed whore, Marie instructs on the importance of contraceptives in "Birth Control," because the pill makes you fat, but a baby makes you twice as fat, while Katy keeps the beat shaking a small babydoll.

Musically speaking, Katy and Marie are seriously talented underneath the raunchy humor. The haunting tune, "Why You've Been Avoiding Me," feels like a melancholic Irish ballad with Katy's full soprano voice and smooth phrasing, but it is the amusing story of Katy discovering her boyfriend's gay porn and duplicitous homosexual life.

The mature audience seemed to appreciate the Reformed Whores' potty mouths during the world debut of "Girls Poop, too."

To bring the show to a joyous conclusion, "Oh, I've Reformed" tops it off with all the naughty things they don't do anymore, things I won't dare mention here.

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