Charleston Museum presents 'To The Bone,' an exploration of what Charlestonians used to eat

Can anyone say turtle soup?

by

comment
Skeleton of a yellow-bellied slider — turtles were a popular menu item in the 1800s. - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • Skeleton of a yellow-bellied slider — turtles were a popular menu item in the 1800s.
Starting next Wed. Oct. 4 you can take a bite out of history with the Charleston Museum's newest exhibit, To The Bone: Charleston Foodways revealed through Archaeology. The exhibit, located in the lobby gallery, explores the procurement, preparation, and serving of foods in Charleston from the 17th century arrival of European settlers and enslaved Africans through the early 20th century.

These animal bones exhibit butchering and cooking marks like hacks, cuts, and saw striations. - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • These animal bones exhibit butchering and cooking marks like hacks, cuts, and saw striations.

This exhibit features research and specimens that have been collected over three decades by archaeological teams at the Charleston Museum, in collaboration with archaeologists and zooarchaeologists at the University of Georgia. Most of what researchers learned of foodways in colonial Charleston is from the recovery and analysis of animal bones. The cuisine that developed was a blend of European, African, and Native American traditions, with foods found in North America.

The exhibit will be on display through Spring 2018.



A screen full of archaeological materials from the South Adger's Wharf site. - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • A screen full of archaeological materials from the South Adger's Wharf site.

Add a comment