S.C. Arts Commission recognized with national "Grantmaker of the Year" honor

"Artists can commit to their chosen crafts and thrive artistically and make a living"

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It ain't easy writing grants and funding arts communities — which is why SCAC will take home an award for doing just that - PROVIDED
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  • It ain't easy writing grants and funding arts communities — which is why SCAC will take home an award for doing just that
The South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) has been awarded the Grantmaker of the Year Award for their continuous support of the South Carolina arts community. Executive director of the SCAC, David Platts, will accept the award on behalf of the agency on Nov. 7 at the Grant Professionals Association (GPA) Annual Conference in Washington.

The Grantmaker of the Year Award recognizes public and private funders that have improved the way grant professionals do their work and acknowledge outstanding contributions to the field of grantsmanship.
In a press release, Platts says it is "gratifying to receive recognition of this magnitude for the work we do." He highlights that "grants from the arts commission ensure artists can commit to their chosen crafts and thrive artistically and make a living."

The SCAC serves the state to develop a thriving art environment essential to the quality of life, education, and economic vitality for South Carolinians. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, SCAC works to increase public participation in the arts by providing grants, direct programs, and staff assistance. This work helps promote partnership in arts education, community arts development, and artist development.



The GPA is an international membership association for everyone in the grants industry working to advance the profession, certify professionals, and fund professionalism.

Alicia Kokkinis, the Grants Officer for the Charleston County School District, says SCAC "provides 1:1 technical support throughout the grantmaking and grant management process." Kokkinis praised the commission for having "a small staff, yet still making the time to talk to potential and current grantees often," citing that "artists are not typically grant professionals."

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