Soundchecks: Liz Cooper & the Stampede, Punk 'N' Drag, Women & Zepplin, 518 Productions, and Anergy,

Live music to catch this week

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LINDSAY PATKOS
  • Lindsay Patkos

PSYCHEDELIC DREAM-ROCK | Liz Cooper & the Stampede
w/ Babe Club
Tues. Feb. 19
9 p.m.
$12/adv., $15/door
Pour House

Nashville trio Liz Cooper & the Stampede is defined by an intuitive bond between Cooper's guitar approach and the subtle skill of bassist Grant Prettyman and drummer Ryan Usher. Cooper's guitar sets the mood with an intricate fingerpicking style that's typically more suited to acoustic playing and a blurred, dreamy tone. Her works turn the songs on the band's latest album, Window Flowers, into hazy, atmospheric but propulsive soundscapes, with Prettyman providing the rhythmic pulse and Usher working in creative embellishments with his kit rather than relying on straightforward timekeeping. It's an impressionistic sound that seems to affect Cooper's lyrical approach. Songs like "Kaleidoscope Eyes" and "The Night" connect images rather than providing a narrative, hanging lines like "Come lose yourself and dance," or "You have kaleidoscope eyes, reflecting shades of tangerine" over top of the band's evocative playing. There's a lot of space in Cooper's songs, and the band doesn't rush to fill it with solos, and it's a difficult sound to classify. Perhaps it's best to simply go with Cooper's description of it as "dreamy, psychedelic rock" and immerse oneself in the music. —Vincent Harris TUESDAY

PROVIDED
  • Provided

PUNK | Punk 'N' Drag: St. Valentine's Heart Attack
w/ Whiskey Warfare, Tongues Of War, The 33's, Gloom Cocoon
Fri. Feb. 15
8 p.m.
Free
Tin Roof

The idea for the Punk 'N' Drag show, a combination of regional punk bands and one very sassy drag queen host trading off performances, came as many great ideas do: Over drinks. Simon Cantlon of Vive Le Rock Productions (the same folks who organize the Rockabillaque Festival every year) was having a few with a friend of his at happy hour when he came up with the idea of mixing drag and punk rock. "I was sitting with a friend at a bar talking about doing a punk event," he says, "and I wanted to do something different. I said, 'What if we put together a show with punk bands playing and drag queens performing in between them?' It brings together the worlds of drag and rock 'n' roll, which in many ways are somewhat similar in their rebellious nature. And I've been doing it for a couple of years now." Typically, the show is based on a holiday theme, and they've done a Punk 'N' Drag show for Christmas, St. Patty's Day, and Halloween, but never Valentine's Day until now. A good slate of punk rock bands deserves a punk rock-style drag queen as a host, and Cantlon says they've found that in the one and only Leslie Lain. "Originally, It was going to be different drag queens hosting, but Lesley proved that she has the right personality," he says. "She doesn't put up with any b.s., she's sarcastic, she's loud and brash, and she can handle the rock 'n' roll crowd — and they love her." —Vincent Harris FRIDAY

PROVIDED
  • Provided

TRIBUTE | Women & Zeppelin
Featuring Lindsay Holler, Lily Slay, Stephanie Underhill, Heather Emrich, Hazel Ketchum, Alva Anderson, and Erin Johns
Sat. Feb. 16
8 p.m.
$15/adv., $17/door
Charleston Music Hall

With the last edition of the Music Hall's "Women & . . ." series, singer Lindsay Holler, who performs at and co-organizes these events, dove into the catalogue of an artist she only had a superficial familiarity with: David Bowie. This time out, she'll be performing songs by Led Zeppelin, a band she's known and loved for a long time. "Personally I am a lot more familiar with the Zeppelin catalogue than Bowie," she says. "They've historically been a lot more on my radar than David Bowie was. So it's kind of been a different experience this time out; it's been a lot more nostalgic, going back and learning to sing the songs I loved, or finding songs that I'm more into now than I was when I first discovered Zeppelin." We didn't push her to give away too much about the material she picked for her portion of the show, but she's willing to give us a hint. "These days I probably lean towards the harder side of Zeppelin," she says. "That's probably what I was thinking more in my mind when I put together the band. But I try to give all the singers enough freedom to choose what they want to do, so we'll definitely have some of the acoustic songs, too." —Vincent Harris SATURDAY

AIMEE ANTHONY
  • Aimee Anthony

Hardcore | 518 Productions Presents
BUT, Pyrite, Pleasures of the Ultraviolent, Longshot Odds
Sat. Feb. 16
9 p.m.
Free
The Sparrow

518 Productions continues their rise to absurdist punk dominance with another round of local and imported thrashers. BUT, Pyrite is an acerbic and puerile group of New Yorkers playing comedic hardcore tracks. Subject matter for their songs comes from how good cereal is with milk ("Cereal") and the unspoken truth about hot rooms ("Swamp Ass"). Pleasures of the Ultraviolent will bring an '80s combat boot crunch with blink-and-you'll-miss-it tunes like "Vampires" and "Boots." Finally, Columbia indie-punks Longshot Odds are set for another return to Charleston. Applying a melodic touch to metallic riffing with songs like "Torn, Tattered, and Screwed," this group of Midlanders is quickly becoming a more frequent sight in the Holy City. —Heath Ellison SATURDAY

PROVIDED
  • Provided

PUNK | Anergy
w/ The Independents, Hale Bopp Astronauts
Fri. Feb. 15
9 p.m.
$8
The Sparrow

Like John Lennon once said, "give punk a chance." And if you're not sure what style of punk is your jam, Anergy just served up a subgenre sampler platter, beautifully titled Anergy Drink. "We did our best to kind of showcase on the album what kinds of different things we're able to do musically," says drummer and vocalist Gabe Segarra. A series of punk shades are represented on the LP from blues-punk and psychobilly ("Off His Pills") to thrash ("Bi in the Belt). Stepping away from 2017's socially conscious "fuck you" or "Not My President," the band finds several different avenues for lyrical content. "The new album is not meant to be political," Segarra comments. "The new album's meant to showcase the other things we can do." The thrash-indebted "Dark Story" gives a bleak revenge narrative about a young man killing his abusive father. "Failskate" shifts gears completely with a third-wave ska riff and a story about a kid who tries skateboarding to impress a girl, only to humiliatingly fall down unnoticed by his crush. —Heath Ellison FRIDAY

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