Sad & Boujee combines trap music and emo tunes for a night of conflicting vibes

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"I hope that my success never alters our relationship." - PROVIDED
  • PROVIDED
  • "I hope that my success never alters our relationship."
Do you think My Chemical Romance could talk to the Migos without uncomfortable pauses in the conversation every 90 seconds?

Do you yell "skrt skrt" every time you storm out of the room when your parents are unsympathetic to your lonely existence?

Then Sad & Boujee, an emo and trap dance party, is probably what you’ve written about in your middle school diary.



This musical Frankenstein, combining two disparate subgenres, will come to the Music Farm on Aug. 23. The tracks will start spinning at 8 p.m. and tickets will run $10 — a price that you can still afford with the allowance your parents give you.

"It’s the go-to party playlist," says Sad & Boujee organizer Sean Salm. "You can feel nostalgic and sing along to '[Welcome to] the Black Parade' or get on the dance floor and twerk to 'Bodak Yellow.' Sad & Boujee is a whole mood."

DJ Grotzy Versace threw the event together and has taken it around the country. The eclectic turntablist includes everything a trap and emo fan would want in their playlist: the Used, 2 Chainz, Simple Plan, 21 Savage. There are also excursions into rap and rock tunes that don’t fall under the emo or trap category, such as Kanye West, the Killers, Post Malone, and Lil Peep.

"We play our songs usually in blocks of three," Salm describes. "We will drop a banger from the emo genre to start the block, give you two more tracks from that same genre then drop a banger from the rap genre to start that block. Then so on and so forth."

And because Sad & Boujee is a sensitive and complicated child, Salm doesn't put it in one box.

"Sad & Boujee is not your average emo party," he continues. "It brings people together. It's a movement."

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