Differences in War

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The Charleston Mercury of the 1800s will be going head-to-head with the New York Times.

As the divided American nation threw its sons into civil war, the home front demanded to know what was happening. Newspapers, North and South responded by sending special war correspondents into the battlefront with the armies and navies of the Union and Confederacy. They reported what they saw and, in many instances, what they wanted to see. As the divided American nation threw its sons into civil war, the home front demanded to know what was happening. Newspapers, North and South responded by sending special war correspondents into the battlefront with the armies and navies of the Union and Confederacy. They reported what they saw and, in many instances, what they wanted to see.

'The Words of War' shows the juxtaposition of the reportage of the Charleston Mercury and the New York Times on eighteen battles from Fort Sumter to Appomattox and is followed by an analysis of each battle by the modern historian (author Donagh Bracken).

The book will be in stores April 1. –GH

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