The Agenda: 30 days to review 40,000 pages; Riley backs look at carriage horse incident; Senators asking about rally permits

Should SPA push for improvements on roads it uses?

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Critics of a proposed downtown cruise port expansion aren't too happy that they only have 30 days to review 40,000 pages of documents submitted by the State Ports Authority that are up for public comment as part of the application process for the $35 million project. The SPA is deferring comment to the Army Corps, which says that for it's part, it's already extended the usual public comment period from 15 days to 30. Source: P&C

N, Charleston Councilman Ron Brinson: "SPA should face roads reality" Source: P&C

Mayor Joe Riley has endorsed calls for independent review of an incident that resulted in a carriage horse either collapsing or sitting in the middle of East Bay Street 10 days ago. Source: P&C

Ten years after it opened to traffic, former state Sen. Arthur Ravenel talks about what it took to rally legislators to support a new bridge between Charleston and Mount Pleasant. Source: AP

State Democrats may follow the lead of other state parties across the nation since the June 17 murders at Mother Emanuel, allegedly by a man who revered the Confederate flag, and rename its annual Jefferson Jackson Dinner. Source: The State

On the other side: "Can the South Carolina GOP get rid of its Confederate ghosts?" Source: NPR

State Senate leaders say they'll ask the state agency that handles rally permits why permits were handed out for simultaneous rallies by the Ku Klux Klan and the Black Panthers earlier this month. S.C. Sen. Harvey Peeler: "Does it make sense to have a Carolina and Clemson rallies at the same time?" Source: The State

By the numbers, about 40 percent of U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham's financial support came from South Carolina residents so far in the presidential race. Source: Gannett

Crews recently lifted a 2.4 million pound component of a new VC Summer nuclear reactor into place with help of a 560-foot crane, one of the world's largest. Source: Columbia Biz Report

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