Designs for apartments set to replace James Island movie theater up for board approval

Early showing

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Conceptual designs for the new apartment complex proposed to be built at 1743 Central Park Road on James Island - GOFF D’ANTONIO ASSOCIATES/ RYAN LUCZKOWIAK
  • Goff D’Antonio Associates/ Ryan Luczkowiak
  • Conceptual designs for the new apartment complex proposed to be built at 1743 Central Park Road on James Island
Plans for a new apartment complex proposed for construction on the site of the now-defunct Carmike James Island 8 movie theater will go before Charleston’s Design Review Board for conceptual approval Monday. Current designs for the project include two main residential buildings — each four stories tall — consisting of 132 total apartment units and 198 parking spaces.

The six-acre property now owned by White Point Partners was purchased in March, and the theater was immediately closed following a deal with Carmike Cinemas Inc. This will be the applicants’ second attempt at receiving conceptual approval from the board after previous renderings that included three separate residential buildings were denied.

The proposed plan to replace the theater with an apartment complex drew comments from a vocal group of James Island residents who called on Charleston City Council to place a two-year moratorium on the construction of apartment complexes on the island. From traffic concerns to the changing character of the island, residents’ sentiments were echoed by Councilwoman Kathleen Wilson, whose district includes much of James Island.
Conceptual site plan for the newly proposed James Island apartment complex that will replace the Carmike James Island 8 movie theater - GOFF D’ANTONIO ASSOCIATES/ RYAN LUCZKOWIAK
  • Goff D’Antonio Associates/ Ryan Luczkowiak
  • Conceptual site plan for the newly proposed James Island apartment complex that will replace the Carmike James Island 8 movie theater
“We have apartments sprouting up left and right. We just lost a movie theater. The Carmike, they sold the property. It was not a profitable theater. It was old. It was rundown. That industry is declining, and they chose to sell to a developer,” Wilson said during a City Council meeting in late March. “I went to that developer and said, ‘This is zoned general business. We could really use some nice new retail, some commercial spaces in the area.’ All we got were apartments.”


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