Charleston area legislator reportedly endorses far-right conspiracy group QAnon

The group is widely critical of President Trump's opponents

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S.C. Rep. Lin Bennett - PHOTO VIA FACEBOOK/TRIDENT UNITED WAY
  • Photo via Facebook/Trident United Way
  • S.C. Rep. Lin Bennett
A member of the South Carolina House of Representatives has repeatedly taken to social media to express support for QAnon, a far-right group that spreads pro-Trump conspiracy theories, according to a Daily Beast report published Thursday.

Linda "Lin" Bennett has represented parts of Charleston and Dorchester counties, including a large swath of West Ashley, in the state legislature since 2016.

According to the Daily Beast, the public official has used her Facebook account to spread the gospel of QAnon, whose disparate and unproven theories are largely based on the idea that government bureaucrats are working against Trump and his agenda as part of the "deep state," a phrase that Trump himself has adopted in attacks against the Department of Justice, where special counsel Robert Mueller is currently investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and possible collusion with the Trump campaign.



Last year, Bennett posted a guide to QAnon and called it “a gem," the Daily Beast reports.

“To say they are ‘interesting’ is an understatement,” Bennett wrote after posting a series of QAnon clues to her page in September. “Wow! Just wow!”

When one friend asked her about a QAnon-related post, she replied, “They’re legit. And they haven’t been wrong.”

The group is widely considered to be connected to the Pizzagate conspiracy theory, which alleged that Democrats ran a secret child sex ring from a Washington, D.C. pizza shop. That idea inspired a 28-year-old North Carolina man to fire a rifle inside the business in December 2016 in an attempt to "self-investigate," according to police.

QAnon followers also believe that Trump's opponents are being secretly charged with crimes and sent to Guantanamo Bay, and some supporters have taken to accusing celebrities of being pedophiles.
Bennett was one of 50 delegates from South Carolina who supported Trump on the first ballot at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio.

Bennett did not immediately respond to calls made by the City Paper to her office and home on Thursday, and her Twitter account is private, though it is unclear if this has been the case for a while.

In 2012, Bennett, then the chairwoman of the Charleston County Republican Party, was caught on video attempting to discourage a state House candidate from filing to run.

"You haven't been praying well," she told Peter vonLehe Ruegner, a candidate for District 110 at the time. "You've been following your heart. Can I talk to you about this before you do this?"

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