Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Green Haus hosts multimedia art showcase to celebrate their first anniversary

Burnin' down the Haus

Posted by Matt Keady on Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 2:28 PM

Green Haus is hosting a showcase to celebrate their first anniversary - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • Green Haus is hosting a showcase to celebrate their first anniversary
Local arts collective, Green Haus, will celebrate their first anniversary with a showcase on Sat. Nov. 16 from 4-7 p.m. at a TBA address that can be found out by contacting them via social media or through their website (greenhausart.com).

The event will consist of multimedia art showcased in a gallery-type setting. Each art piece will follow the guidelines of the showcase's theme: Growth.

Artists include Mariah Gehringer, Emma MacMillan, musician Joseph Dubay, Neal Nakadia, and plenty of others.

The theme was chosen to celebrate Green Haus’s first anniversary of their first showcase. “[We] thought that there is no better way to celebrate than by showing how much we, and other artists, have grown,” says Alex Mielcarek of the showcase.

Local vendors are slated to be a part of the multimedia event.

This event is free and open to the public, and donations for Green Haus will be accepted at the event. “Funds from this will be used to print posters, buy refreshments, and acquire any other Haus items for future events,” explains Mielcarek.

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Fred Wilson speaks at Gibbes' distinguished lecture series this Wed. Nov. 13

With a new exhibition opening in 2020

Posted by Matt Woodhull on Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 10:49 AM

Fred Wilson will make a stop in Charleston - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • Fred Wilson will make a stop in Charleston
Tomorrow, Wed. Nov. 13 the Gibbes Museum of Art's distinguished lecture series features Fred Wilson speaking at the Charleston Music Hall, starting at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $40, and $15 for students.

Wilson, an artist best known for using his art to comment on issues of racism and erasure, will discuss his work — past, present, and future — at this special talk. He'll also be staying in Charleston to conduct research in the Gibbes' archives; he's working on his 2020 Gibbes exhibition, Afro Kismet, as well as a site-specific installation that he's creating with Spoleto's headlining opera, Omar, in mind.

In conjunction with Charleston's 350th anniversary, the Gibbes and Spoleto Festival USA have partnered to further explore the life of Omar Ibn Said, an enslaved Muslim-African man who was brought to Charleston in 1807.

Said's memoir, borrowed from the Library of Congress, will be on display, turned to the page where he mentions Charleston. During a phone interview, executive director of the Gibbes Angela Mack noted how, "unusual and rare it is to have this first-hand account."

Wilson is well-known for working in a museum's collection and seeing what old institutions still reside, forcing society to question our assumptions about history, culture, and race.

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Monday, November 11, 2019

Artist Mary Whyte's 50 veteran portraits featured on "CBS Sunday Morning," on display at City Gallery now

Whyte's work hangs at the City Gallery

Posted by Connor Simonson on Mon, Nov 11, 2019 at 3:57 PM


Award-winning American watercolor artist and Charleston resident Mary Whyte debuted her newest collection of portraits, We the People: Portraits of Veterans in America at The City Gallery on Oct. 25. The series features 50 large-scale watercolor portraits of veterans of all ages and walks — one from each state.

Beginning in 2010, Whyte set out to paint the portraits of 50 present-day American veterans. The end result depicts scenes of a Missouri dairy farmer, Rhode Island lobsterman, Pennsylvania science teacher, South Carolina single mother, and more, with each painting telling its own unique story of post-service life for American veterans.

On Sun. Nov. 11, Whyte's exhibition was featured on CBS Sunday Morning, featuring Martha Teichner's visits with some of Whyte's subjects

We the People will be on display through Dec. 22 at The City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

For more information about the exhibit visit the Patriot Art Foundation website.

To learn more about Mary Whyte, her prior collections, and her career as an award-winning watercolor artist, visit MaryWhyte.com.

Event Details We The People: Portraits of Veterans in America
@ City Gallery at Waterfront Park
34 Prioleau St.
Downtown
Charleston, SC
When: Through Dec. 22
Exhibits

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Gibbes announces finalists for 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art

Winner will be chosen at the end of this month

Posted by Connor Simonson on Mon, Nov 11, 2019 at 9:18 AM

Stephanie Patton is one of six finalists for the $10,000 prize - STEPHANIE PATTON
  • Stephanie Patton
  • Stephanie Patton is one of six finalists for the $10,000 prize
The Gibbes Museum of Art has announced the finalists for the annual 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. One of the finalists, whose work demonstrates the highest level of artistic achievement while contributing to a new understanding of art in the South, will be presented a $10,000 cash prize and have one selected artwork exhibited in the contemporary and modern galleries for the duration of 2020.

Six finalists were chosen this year, as opposed to the usual five "due to the outstanding caliber of candidates received," says Angela Mack, executive director at the Gibbes. In a press release, Mack praised the artists, claiming each finalist "embodies an artist on the forefront of southern contemporary art."

The 1858 Prize for Contemporary Art is presented by Society 1858, a member auxiliary group of the Gibbes. The group supports the Gibbes Museum with social and educational programs tailored for up-and-coming art patrons.

The winner will be announced at the end of November and celebrated at the Society 1858 party at the Gibbes next February.

The 2019 finalists:
Damian Stamer is inspired by quiet moments in abandoned buildings - DAMIAN STAMER
  • Damian Stamer
  • Damian Stamer is inspired by quiet moments in abandoned buildings
Damian Stamer is a North Carolina-based painter whose ongoing series captures old barns "that stand as remnants of American industries founded upon slavery and exploitation." Stamer has exhibited extensively in the Southeastern United States as well as internationally in Tokyo and Budapest. His work is in the permanent collection of The Mint Museum and the North Carolina Museum of Art. 
Dont' K. Hayes' art practice is based on research and references the visual tradition of the American South, the Caribbean, and the African continent - DONTE' K. HAYES
  • Donte' K. Hayes
  • Dont' K. Hayes' art practice is based on research and references the visual tradition of the American South, the Caribbean, and the African continent

Donte' K. Hayes,
a Georgia-based ceramicist influenced by hip-hop, history, and science fiction, creates work that explores themes in Afrofuturism, a project vision of an imagined future that critiques the historical and cultural events of the African diaspora and the black experience in the Middle Passage. Hayes has exhibited extensively across the Southern United States as well as internationally in London and his artwork is in the permanent collection of the Zuckerman Museum of Art, Kennesaw State University, and Spruill Arts Center.

Herb Parker is a longtime professor at CofC - HERB PARKER
  • Herb Parker
  • Herb Parker is a longtime professor at CofC

Herb Parker is a South Carolina-based installation artist and he's been creating nature-based installations, since the mid-seventies. The installations are created to enhance a viewer's perception of the environment and our relationship with nature. These environmental installations evolved from the artist's thoughts on the mechanism of natural systems in time. Parker has been a professor of art at the College of Charleston since 1991. His installations have taken him all over the world, most recently to create exhibits in Alingsas, Sweden and Gongju, Korea.

Martha Clippinger uses objects to play with architecture and draw attention to the relationship between artwork and its surroundings - MARTHA CLIPPINGER
  • Martha Clippinger
  • Martha Clippinger uses objects to play with architecture and draw attention to the relationship between artwork and its surroundings

Martha Clippinger is a North Carolina-based multi-media artist. Clippinger's work blurs the lines between painting and sculpture, fine art and folk, craft and design.  Clippinger most recently exhibited with Elizabeth Harris Gallery in New York, Philadelphia's Magic Garnes, and Hodges Taylor in Charlotte.

Michi Meko's work explores heavy experiences, while trying to remain buoyant - MICHI MEKO
  • Michi Meko
  • Michi Meko's work explores heavy experiences, while trying to remain buoyant
Michi Meko is a Georgia-based multi-media artist. After almost drowning in the summer of 2015, they invited this life-changing event's influence into their studio practice. Meko's recent paintings and sculptures focus on the African-American experience of navigating public spaces. Meko's most recent solo exhibitions include Chimento Contemporary in Los Angeles and the Alan Avery Art Company in Atlanta. Their work also lives in the permanent collection of the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. 

Stephanie Patton is a Louisiana-based multi-media artist who often uses humor as a device to bring attention to critical issues including an exploration of mental and physical health, themes of healing, comfort, and self-preservation. Patton gravitates towards materials and processes that often allude to various emotional states. Patton was recently selected as South Arts 2019 Southern Prize and State Fellows. The artist's work has exhibited at Art Miami, with Arthur Roger Gallery, and the New Orleans Museum of Art. Patton's work lives in permanent collections at the New Orleans Museum of Art and the Frederick R. Weisman Foundation in Los Angeles.

For more information about the Gibbes Museum of Art or Society 1858, visit gibbesmuseum.org

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Friday, November 8, 2019

Rep. Joe Cunningham gets personal at Creative Mornings Charleston

"There's not always going to be a burning bush"

Posted by Connelly Hardaway on Fri, Nov 8, 2019 at 12:23 PM

Cunningham chose to take a seat on the stage to be closer to the Creative Mornings audience - CONNELLY HARDAWAY
  • Connelly Hardaway
  • Cunningham chose to take a seat on the stage to be closer to the Creative Mornings audience
This morning, U.S. Rep. Joe Cunningham sat down on the stage at Queen Street Playhouse to talk to a packed house at Creative Mornings Charleston. He promised to discuss the trials and tribulations he experienced in life, pre-politics. As he put it: "The shit people usually don't talk about."

Admittedly, some political talk would have been interesting, but Cunningham stuck to the basics, waxing poetic about how he got to where he is now.

Anyone can Google Cunningham's bio — born in western Kentucky, the youngest of five boys, his father is a former Kentucky Supreme Court Justice, and his career has included stints as both an engineer and a lawyer. He currently represents South Carolina's 1st Congressional District.

Cunningham spoke on the assigned CM theme, 'lost,' referencing times in his life when he felt like he lacked focus and direction. At 37 years old, Cunningham acknowledged that he was likely older than a lot of the audience, pointing to his first 'lost' moment, the 2008 recession's impact on his job.
Getting laid off is a big setback, of course, but it certainly isn't unusual. None of Cunningham's 'lost' moments were particularly revelatory, and none of his advice anything we (those of us under the age of 37) hadn't heard before.

But for all his reliance on well-worn quotes, Cunningham is a man of the people. He's charming, approachable, self-deprecating, and even a little raw at times. "You're gonna be with yourself a hell of a lot longer than you're gonna be with anyone else," he said, pointing out, "No one else's opinion matters but your own."

"There's not always going to be a burning bush," says Cunningham. There won't always be a guiding light or a Northern star or a sign that says, "Come on down this path, we promise it's safe." Cunningham says that he got to be here, with us on the stage today, because he was drawn to Charleston, because he was drawn to working with and for people.
His advice may not be revolutionary — some form of 'be true to yourself' — but it is the kind of thing you like to hear from your congressman. He preaches empathy and listening to other people. He encourages people to "take a step off the ledge," that it is "better to regret the things you did do than those you didn't."

"Follow your heart," he tells the crowd, "Because we need more people like that in the world."

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