Saturday, June 29, 2019

Fresh Future Farm creates mural with historic images of the Chicora Cherokee neighborhood

Creative placemaking

Posted by Connelly Hardaway on Sat, Jun 29, 2019 at 8:58 AM

Fresh Future Farms' Anik Hall pieced historic images from South Carolina archives for a collage on the back of the farm's grocery store. - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • Fresh Future Farms' Anik Hall pieced historic images from South Carolina archives for a collage on the back of the farm's grocery store.
Fresh Future Farm (FFF) is on a roll right now. The Chicora Cherokee neighborhood garden and community hub is currently raising money through Kickstarter so that chief farm officer Germaine Jenkins can buy the land from the city — and keep the food flowing.
In addition to these efforts, FFF was recently awarded a Southern Creative Places grant from South Arts to create public art that "educates, creates conversations, and increases community pride." South Arts is an organization that works in partnership with state arts agencies of Southern states to address issues important to the region through the arts.

This Creative Places grant helped fund a new mural at FFF, created in collaboration with the S.C. History Room at the Charleston County Public Library and Don Campagna, the history and archives coordinator for the City of North Charleston.

FFF's special projects manager, Anik Hall, collaged images found in these archives (which go all the way back to the 1500s) and translated the collage mock-up into a life sized replica on the back of FFF's grocery store. As part of FFF's current Kickstarter campaign, donors can pay to have their names added to this mural.

The mural is just the beginning of a deep dive into the neighborhood of Chicora Cherokee. FFF staff members have started to record oral histories using the StoryCorps app and the farm plans to host a community dinner that celebrates the mural and expands the oral histories project.

FFF was also awarded a fellowship from the League of Creative Interventionists, a national organization invested in building a network of artists doing creative placemaking work.

You can check out the mural Tuesdays-Fridays, 12-7 p.m. and Saturdays, 7 a.m.-12 p.m. Current and former Chicora Cherokee residents can share pictures and stories with the farm by emailing Hall at specialprojects.freshfuturefarm@gmail.com.
Location Details Fresh Future Farm
2008 Success St.
North Charleston, SC
Lowcountry Farms

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Thursday, June 27, 2019

Charleston environmentalist and photographer J. Henry Fair featured in "The Guardian"

On the edge

Posted by Connelly Hardaway on Thu, Jun 27, 2019 at 3:13 PM

J. Henry Fair wants people to see what overdevelopment and climate change can do to our coastlines - J. HENRY FAIR
  • J. Henry Fair
  • J. Henry Fair wants people to see what overdevelopment and climate change can do to our coastlines
Today, Thurs. June 27, The Guardian published a photo gallery from Charleston photographer J. Henry Fair, pieces that are part of his series, On the Edge: Combahee to Winyah.

On the Edge was on display at the City Gallery last year, highlighting the effect of climate and overdevelopment on Charleston's coastlines.
At the time, Fair told City Paper, "There's a literal meaning in the name, but there's the implied meaning as well, which is that we're not handling our resources sustainably. Not just in South Carolina, but also nationally and internationally. This show is about unsustainable growth and the impending crash."

The Guardian's gallery of photos includes scenes from the Isle of Palms, Kiawah Island, Bulls Bay, the Cooper River, and a tidal creek in Mt. Pleasant.

When we talked to Fair about On the Edge he made it clear that his photographs are not up for interpretation: "I'm an artist that is all about message. To me, the great artists are people with something to say. It's not just about, 'Does it match the sofa?' It's not just decoration; it should be both. It should be visually beautiful, but imbued with a message. And in this case, the message is about the unique and staggering beauty of the South Carolina coast, but also about the threat that it faces and the changes it's undergoing."

Find more of Fair's work online at jhenryfair.com.

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Rhizome Collective's tiny business installation now on display in North Charleston City Hall

#tinyispowerful

Posted by Connelly Hardaway on Thu, Jun 27, 2019 at 2:15 PM

Walk around and peruse some of your fave local businesses, all part of this installation now on display in North Charleston. - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • Walk around and peruse some of your fave local businesses, all part of this installation now on display in North Charleston.
"You Bet 'N Me 'N Me 'N You," the installation created by the Charleston Rhizome Collective for this year's Piccolo Spoleto festival, has moved from its spot at the Cannon Street Arts Center to North Charleston's City Hall. It will be on display through early August.
If you haven't walked around this impressive structure yet, you're missing out on an incredibly detailed recreation of local, small businesses. These are the folks the Rhizome Collective works with — from Monarch Wine Shop to Rose Florist.

The grassroots organization, described as "inter-generational and inter-racial by design," focuses on their project, conNECKtedTOO, which uses art and culture to foster community and build economic development.

When we chatted with the Rhizome Collective ahead of Piccolo Spoleto, member Theron Snype talked about the importance of small businesses: "Everybody's dream is not to become Bill Gates. Some folks want to support their families or live out something that's a passion of theirs. There's one guy that has always wanted to have a place to sell pizza. As simple as that. He doesn't want to be Pizza Hut."

In addition to the installation, conNECKtedTOO features an interactive map — the Active Memory Map — on display at the Main Library downtown, July 1-31. This map, focused on the MLK district of town features street names and addresses and their associated businesses as of today, as well as in the years 1998 and 1968. The collective hopes to create an interactive mobile app to correspond with the map. Learn more about the Rhizome Collective online at connecktedtoo.org.

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Charleston Public Library installs self-checkout kiosks at local branches

Ch-ch-check it out

Posted by Caylin Gregory on Thu, Jun 27, 2019 at 10:00 AM

Forgo human interaction and check one of these books out all by yourself. - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • Forgo human interaction and check one of these books out all by yourself.
Lo and behold, self-checkout isn't just for the grocery store anymore.

Many exciting advancements have been tackled by the Charleston County Public Library (CCPL) as of late. To add to the list, the $108.5 million referendum approved in 2014 has made the funding for self-check kiosks at several CCPL branches possible.

If you’re eager to check out the newest technology, kiosks were installed at the Mt. Pleasant, Hurd/St. Andrews, and Wando libraries earlier this month. Installations in additional area libraries are currently underway.

The kiosks are designed for the convenience of the public. "These new kiosks, which are becoming the standard in libraries throughout the country, increase efficiency and allow staff more time with our patrons, who are our highest priority," said CCPL executive director Angela Craig in a press release. "This is just another way for us to better serve our patrons as we continue to evolve our libraries."

The self-checkout kiosks are meant to be simple, but there are still a few rules:

— Above all, you’ll need your library card and PIN associated with it to access the kiosk. The PIN is simply required to provide extra protection for CCPL patrons, so be sure you keep it to yourself.

— You can do nearly all library tasks at the self-checkout kiosks, even pay fine/fees with a credit card. Cash payment or items such as telescopes, storytime-kits, Children’s Museum passes, and others must be handled at the Circulation Desk.

Check out ccpl.org for more details on the speedy new self-checkout kiosks and where to find them near you.

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Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Lip sync for a role at What If?'s auditions for 'The Legend of Georgia McBride'

You better work it

Posted by Sara Srochi on Wed, Jun 26, 2019 at 4:31 PM

PROVIDED
  • Provided
What If? Productions hosts an audition for a 2020 production, The Legend of Georgia McBride, but with a twist. This Sun. June 30 head to Queen Street Playhouse starting at 1 p.m. to try out for one of five acting gigs in the show.

This ain't your average audition. It's a lot more fun that that. Because you get to lip sync.

In case you don't know, The Legend of Georgia McBride is heavy on the music (although not a musical) and follows the story of Casey, an Elvis impersonator. Everything is going right for Casey until he loses his gig and finds out his wife, Jo, is pregnant. In order to make ends meet, Casey enters the world of drag and with the help of new friends and mentors, becomes a queen.

Rather than singing on their own, the audition requires those trying out to do a lip-sync performance from one of five pre-picked songs.

The show will have a total of five actors, with some playing more than one role. These roles are gender open, too.

Actors are asked to lip-sync one of the five selected songs at the audition: "It’s Raining Men" by The Weather Girls, "Jolene" by Dolly Parton, "Naughty Girl" by Beyonce, "Express Yourself" by Madonna, and "Work Bitch" by Britney Spears.

Callbacks will be held the same day around 2:30 p.m. with readings from the script. Head online for more information on the characters.

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