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Brookgreen Gardens celebrates the Solstice with a Labyrinth walk

Here comes the sun

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Relax a little and walk through a circle a few times. - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • Relax a little and walk through a circle a few times.
Did somebody say day trip? Take Hwy. 17 North for an hour or so and you'll hit the oasis that is Brookgreen Gardens, a sculpture garden and wildlife preserve located just south of Murrells Inlet.

This Fri. June 21, a.k.a. the Summer Solstice, head to Brookgreen for a special event marking the beginning of everyone's favorite season (y'all love the stifling heat, right?) From 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. guests are invited to walk the gardens' labyrinth.

The event starts with a brief talk and then a walk through the labyrinth together; everyone is expected to maintain silence during the walk.

Reflect and relax during your labyrinth walk. - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • Reflect and relax during your labyrinth walk.
So what in the heck is a labyrinth walk? The significance dates back to, well, ancient times, with the symbol of the labyrinth relating to wholeness. Labyrinth walks are often used as a form of walking meditation or spiritual practice.



In the spirit of wholeness, the Summer Solstice Labyrinth walk marks the transition from spring to summer.

A docent of the Labyrinth program at the gardens, Laura Young, says:

Brookgreen Gardens created their labyrinth in 2009 to provide an additional area for contemplation and meditation for guests. As the labyrinth is strongly connected with nature and it has an ancient and fascinating history, its presence supports Brookgreen's primary missions related to nature and education. The labyrinth program started in 2017 and consists of group walks, classroom sessions including both introductions to new walkers and labyrinth history, open sessions on the labyrinth where guests may pose questions and discuss the labyrinth with a trained docent and other experiential opportunities on the labyrinth. It is a volunteer-led program overseen by Brookgreen Gardens management and is headed up by a Veriditas-certified labyrinth facilitator. Interested volunteers are trained as docents or helpers, depending on their level of interest.
And while labyrinths have a history rooted in faith traditions, today they are more often used as a way to clear and focus the mind, reduce stress, and foster reflection. Learn even more about labyrinths in a podcast with Young.


Learn more about Brookgreen Gardens and all of their programs online at brookgreen.org.

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