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Set the Agenda: Graham, Ports, Haley, and more

Meetings we'll be watching this week

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Lindsey Graham is in town today, offering a different approach toward deepening the Charleston Harbor. The project will need hundreds of millions of dollars, but the first step is $400,000 to study the deepening that we still haven't found yet. Graham will be sitting down with Asst. Sec. of the Army Jo-Ellen Darcy, head of the Army Corps of Engineers civil works program. Similar to Joe Riley's efforts to pitch a Crosstown flooding fix to bureaucrats as a national security issue, Graham will be stressing the need for the harbor project to bureaucratic leaders. Up to this point, much of the attention has been on Graham's effort to sell the project to his fellow legislators.

Personalities are going to come out on the Charleston County School Board tonight. The board will consider a request for a board hearing from frequent district critic Henry Copeland. The former downtown Constituent School Board member has been barred from appearing at some community hearings and was ticketed for attending a budget forum at Burke High School last week. He has some support on the board, but it may not be enough.

Gov. Nikki Haley will be making the last stop Wednesday on her report card tour. Haley has been criss-crossing the state to pitch her priorities for the state legislature, as well as her plan to grade them on their progress. We're curious to see how this is packaged. Will she tell voters that this is how they should measure her progress in Columbia, as well?

This may be a wonky issue for a lot of readers, but the City of Charleston's Planning Commission will give an important vote on Wednesday that could reshape the Commercial Corridor Design Review Board. The changes proposed by city staff would bring the group in for conceptual and preliminary review on projects, but leave the technical, back-end approval to city planning staff. Some community activists have relied on the close scrutiny of the city's planning and zoning boards and will be out to publicly oppose the change.

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