Spring 2009 CSAs Available

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Say goodbye to weeks-old, travel-worn produce at the grocery store. Here's your chance to buy local, eat healthy, and be lazy all at the same time. Legare Farms has opened up their Community Supported Agriculture program to new members. Sign up and you'll get 15 weeks of fresh-off-the-farm produce delivered to your door — nine weeks in the spring/summer, a mid-summer break, and six weeks in the fall. For $355, you'll receive a half-bushel of a variety of produce every week. That comes out to about $23 a week — not bad if you eat lots of veggies, and awesome if you consider the variety you'll be getting, with some really unique stuff thrown in. The deadline for signing up is Feb. 15, but last year they completely sold out, so we recommend you jump on it! (843) 559-0763.

Another option is Ambrose Family Farm. They offer different options for different family sizes for their approximately 12-week season: $450 for an extra large family (6-8 people), $375 for a large family (4-6), $250 for medium (2-4), and $160 for one person (!). Members pick up their weekly haul at various locations around the Lowcountry. Here's their list of probable crops for the Spring '09 Season:

"Asparagus, Strawberries, Blue Berries, Black Berries, Lettuce (4 to 6 varities), Arugula, Collards, Salad Mixes, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Beets, Carrots, Turnips, Radishes, Spinach, Bok Choi, Tomatoes, Heirloom Tomatoes, Cucumbers, Cantaloup, Watermelon, Yellow Squash, Zucchini, Patty Pan Squash, Spaghetti Squash, Egg Plant, Snap Beans, Butter Beans, Sweet Green Peas, Okra, Scallion Onions, Pete's Sweet Onions, Garlic, Basil, Cilantro, Dill, Bell Peppers, Jalapeno Peppers, Sweet Corn (NOT ORGANIC), Flowers for cutting. Beans, peas, okra, some fresh cut flowers, and some varities of herbs will be available for Pick Your Own."

It's a great deal, a responsible choice, but recognize that there are risks. If the crop get wiped out by frost or a hurricane, you're screwed along with everyone else. Still, I think it's a good risk to take. Check out City Paper's article on CSAs here.

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